Landscape, in C sharp minor

"Dripping yellow paint 02" by Rookuzz.. is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

This is how you turn music into color.

“Model required.” Casting call.

In they come, one by one, heels clicking thunder on the gallery’s hardwood floors. The oak is centuries too old for this. The eleven o’clock sun rains in through the glass panes, flooding the space with light, making love midway to the Beethoven streaming through the speakers in the corner. What color is a sonata anyway?

An empty frame, in silver and gold, waits obediently against the white wall.

The first model climbs in, a well behaved hue of blue. She disrobes timidly, looks down. A study in neoclassicism; line over color, a sublimation of the form. The model as an ideal; an aria in monochrome.

I pull out my brush.

“Is yellow warm or cold?”

The model does not talk back. She does not look up. I ask again anyway, and dip the brush in paint. Under my strokes, her pliant fingers, elbows, bare shoulders comply. She evaporates before my eyes, in a muted green haze. I paint a “Still life in aqua.”

But it is not a sonata, so I help her out of the frame. Wafts of green trail behind her as the heels click apologetically out of the room.

The second model hurricanes in, a red so concrete it turns the air opaque. Her angular heels poke holes in the canvas as she climbs into the frame. A study in abstraction; the model as a structure. Order and discipline, uncorrupted design, to which my paintbrush wrecks havoc. A revolution in the frame.

“Is yellow warm or cold?”

The model does not, cannot hear me. The warring colors are so loud, even Beethoven is muted. With shards of neon orange, my brush stokes the flames. I paint a “Portraiture of fragments.”

Still, not a sonata, so I shake my head. She marches out, defiant. The air behind her clears. I hear the floorboards creak again.

What color is a sonata? Is yellow warm or cold?

The third model walks in, and suddenly, the music explodes.

She is the three primaries. The blonde, brunette, and the redhead. The red, yellow, and blue. The model as a possibility, the multiplicity of the self. Vulnerable and provocative, sensuous and naïve. She climbs into the frame, and stares. At me.

I burst into pigments like ripe summer fruit; infinite colors and notes spill out. Soaking the canvas, overflowing the frame, dripping onto the parched oak. Staining the walls, the music, the light. The whole gallery becomes a self-portrait.

There are buckets of paint everywhere, on every surface, in every shade, and I use them all. The sonata is every color I want it to be. Warm and cold and vibrant and bright, it rolls off my tongue, my lips, my chin like syrupy elderflower.

The music rises frantically to a final trill. I paint a “Landscape, in C sharp minor.”

Filed under Color
Yara Y. Zgheib

Yara is a bookworm, writer, and passionate consumer of wine and chocolate. Born in Beirut, she has lived in Glasgow, Washington, Paris, and Saint Louis, and is not done traveling yet. She is a Fulbright scholar with a PhD in international affairs, who has also taught art history in the US, ballet in China, and etiquette in France. Yara is the author of “Biography of a Little Prince”, a memoir of her adventures with a little boy dear to her heart. Her blog, “Aristotle at Afternoon Tea”, is a compilation of weekly essays on politics, art, culture, economics, literature, and philosophy. Her idea of a smart conversation over afternoon tea, and she loves company.